Saturday, February 23, 2013

The Future Med from Singularity Hub

 

The Future Med from Singularity Hub has arrived on the Health Train Express. As usual the brightest minds presented new ideas already in existence and some likely developments in the near.

Singularity University was the site for FutureMed 2013 in Silicon Valley at the NASA Ames Facility It wasn't cheap but the $ 8500 USD fee provided a turnkey experience..room..board...and the chance to hang with the 1%. I suppose most people can find a way to write it off as a deduction and have Uncle Sam subsidize your educational bent.

One can chose to hear it first, smell the crowd and wallow lavishly in the sound of bling on your neighbor's wrist or neck. Or if you are like me, the lowly physician who has seen his overhead skyrocket from 35-55% to over 80%, and has had to cease and desist from charity care in favor of supporting ObamaCare, you will attend online via a number of sources ranging from streaming video to informed bloggers and national media sources.

Most of this stuff is so advanced that a delay of one day, one week, one month, or one year is not going to amount to a significant disadvantage of not attending the 'hatching'.

FutureMed is geared around six exponentially growing areas, each taught by world class experts from the worlds of medicine, biotech and innovation. These include lectures, workshops, discussions and site visits.

1. INFORMATION – DATA DRIVEN HEALTH: Digitization of healthcare, Electronic health records, Imaging Technology, Wearable devices, Wireless monitoring to ubiquitous Apps. The ‘Big Data’ explosion… from Imaging & Diagnostics to Mobile & Internet Enabled Health… Knowledge liquidity and leveraging information to enhance diagnostics, prevention and therapy…

2. PERSONALIZED MEDICINE & ‘Omics: Low cost, point of care Genomics, Proteomics, Metabolomics, Environmental monitoring… from Systems Medicine to the rapidly emerging world of Synthetic Biology and DIY-Genomics.

3. REGENERATIVE MEDICINE: Stem cells & beyond for the repair, replacement and regeneration of tissues and organs damaged by aging, trauma or disease, from cell therapy to limb regeneration. Cellular alchemy (reprogramming skin cell to cardiomyocytes) to tissue engineering and 3-D printing of organs and tissues.

4. FUTURE INTERVENTION: From Robotic Surgery, Bionic limbs and Exoskeletons, Smart pills, and Implantable Devices, to Targeted gene therapy, and ever shrinking and more capable devices, Nanomedicine.

5. NEUROMEDICINE: Real time brain imaging, Brain computer interface (BCI), Cognitive Enhancement, Targeted neurointervention, Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine.

6. MEDTECH/BIOTECH & ENTREPRENEURSHIP: Includes the future of Pharma and Drug Discovery, Synthetic Biology, Medical Device Development and the funding, opportunities and barriers (regulatory and otherwise) of biomedical innovation. The Drive to lower costs and more effective therapies. Impact of the FDA to Healthcare Models (Accountable Care Organizations).

The program focuses on three specific Application Areas, specifically the Future of…

MEDICAL PRACTICE & PATIENT ENGAGEMENT: How will convergent technologies impact the practice of medicine, diagnostics and clinical decision support, to new models of care from concierge practices to telemedicine… from feedback loops with patients utilizing wearable physiologic monitors, the networked ‘Medical home’ and beyond. Can care get better and at lower costs?  How will better informed, engaged and socially connected patients interact with the healthcare system?

HEALTH & WELLNESS:How will personalization, nutrigenomics and regenerative medicine impact wellness, prevention and longevity?

GLOBAL HEALTH: Leveraging technology for the developing world, and learning lessons from the underdeveloped to apply in ours, from rapid viral detection & forcasting and vaccine development to strategies to prevent and treat disease in underserved and remote communities.

Here are some specifics:

FutureMed Schedule: FutureMed Singularity University: FutureMed2013: Highlights of 2013

Perhaps one of the week’s most inspiring moments came when Jack Andraka’s 15-minute talk, “The Future of Oncology,” brought the room to its feet on Tuesday. Though Andraka is but a sophomore in high school, he’s invented a new diagnostic technique for pancreatic cancer using carbon nanotubes.

Catherine Mohr, Director of Medical Research at Intuitive Surgical, delivered a fascinating lecture on the future of robotic surgery. Robotic surgery isn’t itself the disruptive technology, she said. Rather, as cutting edge diagnostic tools on the molecular level allow oncologists to diagnose earlier and earlier, surgeons will need to remove smaller and smaller tumors. Put simply, robotic surgical systems won’t drive this change—they’ll need to adapt to it.

Big data was another prime theme this year. Information that was once limited to a few select individuals in a lab or exclusive scientific community is now available to the public at large. Never mind credentials—great ideas can come from outsiders, peeking in with fresh eyes and a beginner’s mind. Indeed, Andraka used Google, Wikipedia, and free online journal articles to do the initial research behind his diagnostic invention.

Stanford’s Atul Butte told participants, “We’re drowning in data.” Butte’s Stanford lab outsources experiments, finding it more efficient to simply buy data for analysis. Just as kids in garages once built computers, incoming generations will create “garage pharma” and “dormroom biotech.”

Kohn’s session was paired with famed investor Vinod Khosla who spoke of decreasing the need for physicians and leveraging big data and data analytics to improve diagnostics and outcomes. And later in the week, FutureMed welcomed Dr. Farzad Mostashari, National Coordinator for Health and Information Technology. Mostashari said that by leveraging more connected medical records we can dramatically improve outcomes.

Andrew Hessel on synthetic biology—the use of DNA as a programming language to build living systems from the ground up.

Alan Russel on regenerative medicine and how to speed the body’s natural ability to heal itself.

The Computer History Museum capped the program with a day of demos, talks, and a pitch contest by 17 biotech and health startups from around the world. Singularity University alum, Erez Livneh, won the pitch contest with his company Vecoy Nanomedicines. Vecoy makes nanoparticle “virus traps” that mimic human cells and lure viruses (eg., HIV, influenza, hepatitis, herpes) to attack them—once lured into the trap, the nanoparticles inactivate the virus.

And now for the Star Trek 'Tricorder', once science fiction and now almost a reality.

The Future Med from Singularity Hub has arrived on the Health Train Express. As usual the brightest minds presented new ideas already in existence and some likely developments in the near.

Singularity University was the site for FutureMed 2013 in Silicon Valley at the NASA Ames Facility It wasn't cheap but the $ 8500 USD fee provided a turnkey experience..room..board...and the chance to hang with the 1%. I suppose most people can find a way to write it off as a deduction and have Uncle Sam subsidize your educational bent.

One can chose to hear it first, smell the crowd and wallow lavishly in the sound of bling on your neighbor's wrist or neck. Or if you are like me, the lowly physician who has seen his overhead skyrocket from 35-55% to over 80%, and has had to cease and desist from charity care in favor of supporting ObamaCare, you will attend online via a number of sources ranging from streaming video to informed bloggers and national media sources.

Most of this stuff is so advanced that a delay of one day, one week, one month, or one year is not going to amount to a significant disadvantage of not attending the 'hatching'.

FutureMed is geared around six exponentially growing areas, each taught by world class experts from the worlds of medicine, biotech and innovation. These include lectures, workshops, discussions and site visits.

1. INFORMATION – DATA DRIVEN HEALTH: Digitization of healthcare, Electronic health records, Imaging Technology, Wearable devices, Wireless monitoring to ubiquitous Apps. The ‘Big Data’ explosion… from Imaging & Diagnostics to Mobile & Internet Enabled Health… Knowledge liquidity and leveraging information to enhance diagnostics, prevention and therapy…

2. PERSONALIZED MEDICINE & ‘Omics: Low cost, point of care Genomics, Proteomics, Metabolomics, Environmental monitoring… from Systems Medicine to the rapidly emerging world of Synthetic Biology and DIY-Genomics.

3. REGENERATIVE MEDICINE: Stem cells & beyond for the repair, replacement and regeneration of tissues and organs damaged by aging, trauma or disease, from cell therapy to limb regeneration. Cellular alchemy (reprogramming skin cell to cardiomyocytes) to tissue engineering and 3-D printing of organs and tissues.

4. FUTURE INTERVENTION: From Robotic Surgery, Bionic limbs and Exoskeletons, Smart pills, and Implantable Devices, to Targeted gene therapy, and ever shrinking and more capable devices, Nanomedicine.

5. NEUROMEDICINE: Real time brain imaging, Brain computer interface (BCI), Cognitive Enhancement, Targeted neurointervention, Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine.

6. MEDTECH/BIOTECH & ENTREPRENEURSHIP: Includes the future of Pharma and Drug Discovery, Synthetic Biology, Medical Device Development and the funding, opportunities and barriers (regulatory and otherwise) of biomedical innovation. The Drive to lower costs and more effective therapies. Impact of the FDA to Healthcare Models (Accountable Care Organizations).

The program focuses on three specific Application Areas, specifically the Future of…

MEDICAL PRACTICE & PATIENT ENGAGEMENT: How will convergent technologies impact the practice of medicine, diagnostics and clinical decision support, to new models of care from concierge practices to telemedicine… from feedback loops with patients utilizing wearable physiologic monitors, the networked ‘Medical home’ and beyond. Can care get better and at lower costs?  How will better informed, engaged and socially connected patients interact with the healthcare system?

HEALTH & WELLNESS:How will personalization, nutrigenomics and regenerative medicine impact wellness, prevention and longevity?

GLOBAL HEALTH: Leveraging technology for the developing world, and learning lessons from the underdeveloped to apply in ours, from rapid viral detection & forcasting and vaccine development to strategies to prevent and treat disease in underserved and remote communities.

Here are some specifics:

FutureMed Schedule: FutureMed Singularity University: FutureMed2013: Highlights of 2013

Perhaps one of the week’s most inspiring moments came when Jack Andraka’s 15-minute talk, “The Future of Oncology,” brought the room to its feet on Tuesday. Though Andraka is but a sophomore in high school, he’s invented a new diagnostic technique for pancreatic cancer using carbon nanotubes.

Catherine Mohr, Director of Medical Research at Intuitive Surgical, delivered a fascinating lecture on the future of robotic surgery. Robotic surgery isn’t itself the disruptive technology, she said. Rather, as cutting edge diagnostic tools on the molecular level allow oncologists to diagnose earlier and earlier, surgeons will need to remove smaller and smaller tumors. Put simply, robotic surgical systems won’t drive this change—they’ll need to adapt to it.

Big data was another prime theme this year. Information that was once limited to a few select individuals in a lab or exclusive scientific community is now available to the public at large. Never mind credentials—great ideas can come from outsiders, peeking in with fresh eyes and a beginner’s mind. Indeed, Andraka used Google, Wikipedia, and free online journal articles to do the initial research behind his diagnostic invention.

Stanford’s Atul Butte told participants, “We’re drowning in data.” Butte’s Stanford lab outsources experiments, finding it more efficient to simply buy data for analysis. Just as kids in garages once built computers, incoming generations will create “garage pharma” and “dormroom biotech.”

Kohn’s session was paired with famed investor Vinod Khosla who spoke of decreasing the need for physicians and leveraging big data and data analytics to improve diagnostics and outcomes. And later in the week, FutureMed welcomed Dr. Farzad Mostashari, National Coordinator for Health and Information Technology. Mostashari said that by leveraging more connected medical records we can dramatically improve outcomes.

Andrew Hessel on synthetic biology—the use of DNA as a programming language to build living systems from the ground up.

Alan Russel on regenerative medicine and how to speed the body’s natural ability to heal itself.

The Computer History Museum capped the program with a day of demos, talks, and a pitch contest by 17 biotech and health startups from around the world. Singularity University alum, Erez Livneh, won the pitch contest with his company Vecoy Nanomedicines. Vecoy makes nanoparticle “virus traps” that mimic human cells and lure viruses (eg., HIV, influenza, hepatitis, herpes) to attack them—once lured into the trap, the nanoparticles inactivate the virus.

And now for the Star Trek 'Tricorder', once science fiction and now almost a reality.

The Future Med from Singularity Hub has arrived on the Health Train Express. As usual the brightest minds presented new ideas already in existence and some likely developments in the near.

Singularity University was the site for FutureMed 2013 in Silicon Valley at the NASA Ames Facility It wasn't cheap but the $ 8500 USD fee provided a turnkey experience..room..board...and the chance to hang with the 1%. I suppose most people can find a way to write it off as a deduction and have Uncle Sam subsidize your educational bent.

One can chose to hear it first, smell the crowd and wallow lavishly in the sound of bling on your neighbor's wrist or neck. Or if you are like me, the lowly physician who has seen his overhead skyrocket from 35-55% to over 80%, and has had to cease and desist from charity care in favor of supporting ObamaCare, you will attend online via a number of sources ranging from streaming video to informed bloggers and national media sources.

Most of this stuff is so advanced that a delay of one day, one week, one month, or one year is not going to amount to a significant disadvantage of not attending the 'hatching'.

FutureMed is geared around six exponentially growing areas, each taught by world class experts from the worlds of medicine, biotech and innovation. These include lectures, workshops, discussions and site visits.

1. INFORMATION – DATA DRIVEN HEALTH: Digitization of healthcare, Electronic health records, Imaging Technology, Wearable devices, Wireless monitoring to ubiquitous Apps. The ‘Big Data’ explosion… from Imaging & Diagnostics to Mobile & Internet Enabled Health… Knowledge liquidity and leveraging information to enhance diagnostics, prevention and therapy…

2. PERSONALIZED MEDICINE & ‘Omics: Low cost, point of care Genomics, Proteomics, Metabolomics, Environmental monitoring… from Systems Medicine to the rapidly emerging world of Synthetic Biology and DIY-Genomics.

3. REGENERATIVE MEDICINE: Stem cells & beyond for the repair, replacement and regeneration of tissues and organs damaged by aging, trauma or disease, from cell therapy to limb regeneration. Cellular alchemy (reprogramming skin cell to cardiomyocytes) to tissue engineering and 3-D printing of organs and tissues.

4. FUTURE INTERVENTION: From Robotic Surgery, Bionic limbs and Exoskeletons, Smart pills, and Implantable Devices, to Targeted gene therapy, and ever shrinking and more capable devices, Nanomedicine.

5. NEUROMEDICINE: Real time brain imaging, Brain computer interface (BCI), Cognitive Enhancement, Targeted neurointervention, Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine.

6. MEDTECH/BIOTECH & ENTREPRENEURSHIP: Includes the future of Pharma and Drug Discovery, Synthetic Biology, Medical Device Development and the funding, opportunities and barriers (regulatory and otherwise) of biomedical innovation. The Drive to lower costs and more effective therapies. Impact of the FDA to Healthcare Models (Accountable Care Organizations).

The program focuses on three specific Application Areas, specifically the Future of…

MEDICAL PRACTICE & PATIENT ENGAGEMENT: How will convergent technologies impact the practice of medicine, diagnostics and clinical decision support, to new models of care from concierge practices to telemedicine… from feedback loops with patients utilizing wearable physiologic monitors, the networked ‘Medical home’ and beyond. Can care get better and at lower costs?  How will better informed, engaged and socially connected patients interact with the healthcare system?

HEALTH & WELLNESS:How will personalization, nutrigenomics and regenerative medicine impact wellness, prevention and longevity?

GLOBAL HEALTH: Leveraging technology for the developing world, and learning lessons from the underdeveloped to apply in ours, from rapid viral detection & forcasting and vaccine development to strategies to prevent and treat disease in underserved and remote communities.

Here are some specifics:

FutureMed Schedule: FutureMed Singularity University: FutureMed2013: Highlights of 2013

Perhaps one of the week’s most inspiring moments came when Jack Andraka’s 15-minute talk, “The Future of Oncology,” brought the room to its feet on Tuesday. Though Andraka is but a sophomore in high school, he’s invented a new diagnostic technique for pancreatic cancer using carbon nanotubes.

Catherine Mohr, Director of Medical Research at Intuitive Surgical, delivered a fascinating lecture on the future of robotic surgery. Robotic surgery isn’t itself the disruptive technology, she said. Rather, as cutting edge diagnostic tools on the molecular level allow oncologists to diagnose earlier and earlier, surgeons will need to remove smaller and smaller tumors. Put simply, robotic surgical systems won’t drive this change—they’ll need to adapt to it.

Big data was another prime theme this year. Information that was once limited to a few select individuals in a lab or exclusive scientific community is now available to the public at large. Never mind credentials—great ideas can come from outsiders, peeking in with fresh eyes and a beginner’s mind. Indeed, Andraka used Google, Wikipedia, and free online journal articles to do the initial research behind his diagnostic invention.

Stanford’s Atul Butte told participants, “We’re drowning in data.” Butte’s Stanford lab outsources experiments, finding it more efficient to simply buy data for analysis. Just as kids in garages once built computers, incoming generations will create “garage pharma” and “dormroom biotech.”

Kohn’s session was paired with famed investor Vinod Khosla who spoke of decreasing the need for physicians and leveraging big data and data analytics to improve diagnostics and outcomes. And later in the week, FutureMed welcomed Dr. Farzad Mostashari, National Coordinator for Health and Information Technology. Mostashari said that by leveraging more connected medical records we can dramatically improve outcomes.

Andrew Hessel on synthetic biology—the use of DNA as a programming language to build living systems from the ground up.

Alan Russel on regenerative medicine and how to speed the body’s natural ability to heal itself.

The Computer History Museum capped the program with a day of demos, talks, and a pitch contest by 17 biotech and health startups from around the world. Singularity University alum, Erez Livneh, won the pitch contest with his company Vecoy Nanomedicines. Vecoy makes nanoparticle “virus traps” that mimic human cells and lure viruses (eg., HIV, influenza, hepatitis, herpes) to attack them—once lured into the trap, the nanoparticles inactivate the virus.

The Future Med from Singularity Hub has arrived on the Health Train Express. As usual the brightest minds presented new ideas already in existence and some likely developments in the near.

Singularity University was the site for FutureMed 2013 in Silicon Valley at the NASA Ames Facility It wasn't cheap but the $ 8500 USD fee provided a turnkey experience..room..board...and the chance to hang with the 1%. I suppose most people can find a way to write it off as a deduction and have Uncle Sam subsidize your educational bent.

One can chose to hear it first, smell the crowd and wallow lavishly in the sound of bling on your neighbor's wrist or neck. Or if you are like me, the lowly physician who has seen his overhead skyrocket from 35-55% to over 80%, and has had to cease and desist from charity care in favor of supporting ObamaCare, you will attend online via a number of sources ranging from streaming video to informed bloggers and national media sources.

Most of this stuff is so advanced that a delay of one day, one week, one month, or one year is not going to amount to a significant disadvantage of not attending the 'hatching'.

FutureMed is geared around six exponentially growing areas, each taught by world class experts from the worlds of medicine, biotech and innovation. These include lectures, workshops, discussions and site visits.

1. INFORMATION – DATA DRIVEN HEALTH: Digitization of healthcare, Electronic health records, Imaging Technology, Wearable devices, Wireless monitoring to ubiquitous Apps. The ‘Big Data’ explosion… from Imaging & Diagnostics to Mobile & Internet Enabled Health… Knowledge liquidity and leveraging information to enhance diagnostics, prevention and therapy…

2. PERSONALIZED MEDICINE & ‘Omics: Low cost, point of care Genomics, Proteomics, Metabolomics, Environmental monitoring… from Systems Medicine to the rapidly emerging world of Synthetic Biology and DIY-Genomics.

3. REGENERATIVE MEDICINE: Stem cells & beyond for the repair, replacement and regeneration of tissues and organs damaged by aging, trauma or disease, from cell therapy to limb regeneration. Cellular alchemy (reprogramming skin cell to cardiomyocytes) to tissue engineering and 3-D printing of organs and tissues.

4. FUTURE INTERVENTION: From Robotic Surgery, Bionic limbs and Exoskeletons, Smart pills, and Implantable Devices, to Targeted gene therapy, and ever shrinking and more capable devices, Nanomedicine.

5. NEUROMEDICINE: Real time brain imaging, Brain computer interface (BCI), Cognitive Enhancement, Targeted neurointervention, Psychiatry and Behavioral Medicine.

6. MEDTECH/BIOTECH & ENTREPRENEURSHIP: Includes the future of Pharma and Drug Discovery, Synthetic Biology, Medical Device Development and the funding, opportunities and barriers (regulatory and otherwise) of biomedical innovation. The Drive to lower costs and more effective therapies. Impact of the FDA to Healthcare Models (Accountable Care Organizations).

The program focuses on three specific Application Areas, specifically the Future of…

MEDICAL PRACTICE & PATIENT ENGAGEMENT: How will convergent technologies impact the practice of medicine, diagnostics and clinical decision support, to new models of care from concierge practices to telemedicine… from feedback loops with patients utilizing wearable physiologic monitors, the networked ‘Medical home’ and beyond. Can care get better and at lower costs?  How will better informed, engaged and socially connected patients interact with the healthcare system?

HEALTH & WELLNESS:How will personalization, nutrigenomics and regenerative medicine impact wellness, prevention and longevity?

GLOBAL HEALTH: Leveraging technology for the developing world, and learning lessons from the underdeveloped to apply in ours, from rapid viral detection & forcasting and vaccine development to strategies to prevent and treat disease in underserved and remote communities.

Here are some specifics:

FutureMed Schedule: FutureMed Singularity University: FutureMed2013: Highlights of 2013

Perhaps one of the week’s most inspiring moments came when Jack Andraka’s 15-minute talk, “The Future of Oncology,” brought the room to its feet on Tuesday. Though Andraka is but a sophomore in high school, he’s invented a new diagnostic technique for pancreatic cancer using carbon nanotubes.

Catherine Mohr, Director of Medical Research at Intuitive Surgical, delivered a fascinating lecture on the future of robotic surgery. Robotic surgery isn’t itself the disruptive technology, she said. Rather, as cutting edge diagnostic tools on the molecular level allow oncologists to diagnose earlier and earlier, surgeons will need to remove smaller and smaller tumors. Put simply, robotic surgical systems won’t drive this change—they’ll need to adapt to it.

Big data was another prime theme this year. Information that was once limited to a few select individuals in a lab or exclusive scientific community is now available to the public at large. Never mind credentials—great ideas can come from outsiders, peeking in with fresh eyes and a beginner’s mind. Indeed, Andraka used Google, Wikipedia, and free online journal articles to do the initial research behind his diagnostic invention.

Stanford’s Atul Butte told participants, “We’re drowning in data.” Butte’s Stanford lab outsources experiments, finding it more efficient to simply buy data for analysis. Just as kids in garages once built computers, incoming generations will create “garage pharma” and “dormroom biotech.”

Kohn’s session was paired with famed investor Vinod Khosla who spoke of decreasing the need for physicians and leveraging big data and data analytics to improve diagnostics and outcomes. And later in the week, FutureMed welcomed Dr. Farzad Mostashari, National Coordinator for Health and Information Technology. Mostashari said that by leveraging more connected medical records we can dramatically improve outcomes.

Andrew Hessel on synthetic biology—the use of DNA as a programming language to build living systems from the ground up.

Alan Russel on regenerative medicine and how to speed the body’s natural ability to heal itself.

The Computer History Museum capped the program with a day of demos, talks, and a pitch contest by 17 biotech and health startups from around the world. Singularity University alum, Erez Livneh, won the pitch contest with his company Vecoy Nanomedicines. Vecoy makes nanoparticle “virus traps” that mimic human cells and lure viruses (eg., HIV, influenza, hepatitis, herpes) to attack them—once lured into the trap, the nanoparticles inactivate the virus.

And now for the Star Trek 'Tricorder', once science fiction and now almost a reality.

 

 

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