Tuesday, September 20, 2016

The great question of the 21st century: Whose black box do you trust? - O'Reilly Media


Some years ago, John Mattison, the chief medical information officer of Kaiser Permanente, the large integrated health provider, said, "The great question of the 21st century is going to be 'Whose black box do you trust?'"



Mattison was talking about the growing importance of algorithms in medicine, but his point, more broadly, was that we increasingly place our trust in systems whose methods for making decisions we do not understand. (A black box, by definition, is a system whose inputs and outputs are known, but the system by which one is transformed to the other is unknown.)
A lot of attention has been paid to the role of algorithms in shaping the experience of consumers. Much less attention has been paid to the role of algorithms in shaping the incentives for business decision-making.
Eli Pariser warned of a "filter bubble," in which the algorithm takes account of our preferences and continues to feed us more of what we already want to hear, rather than exposing us to other points of view. This is a real risk—though one that search engines and social media companies are making efforts to overcome.
But there's a deeper, more pervasive risk that came out in a conversation I had recently with Chris O'Brien of VentureBeat.  
As Warren Buffet is reputed to have said, "It takes 20 years to build a reputation and five minutes to ruin it. If you think about that, you'll do things differently."
Because many of the algorithms that shape our society are black boxes—either for reasons like those cited by Facebook, or because they are, in the world of deep learning, inscrutable even to their creators—that question of trust is key.

Understanding how to evaluate algorithms without knowing the exact rules they follow is a key discipline in today's world. And it is possible. Here are four rules for evaluating whether you can trust an algorithm:
  1. Its creators have made clear what outcome they are seeking, and it is possible for external observers to verify that outcome.
  2. Success is measurable.
  3. The goals of the algorithm's creators are aligned with the goals of the algorithm's consumers.
  4. Does the algorithm lead its creators and its users to make better longer term decisions?

Friday, September 16, 2016

Special Edition Improve SEO rankings

For my loyal followers, and yes there are some out there. For the past 7 years or so I have been blogging consistently.

P A U S E...............................




I will be pausing for several weeks to prepare for 'Occupy Health".  which will take place on October 23, 2016  11 AM-4PM local time. Digital Health Space will resume publication in November shortly after the Presidential Elections



Further details forthcoming on the Facebook Page

Bonus material



Improve SEO rankings

Thursday, September 15, 2016

The Real Future of Health Care Reform....

The future of health care reform is really that of innovation and health information technology.  These changes will impact your health care more than politics, elections, or congress.

It is dynamic, and scales exponentially.

The largest barriers to innovation remain to be organizational structures already in existence. 1. Government 2. Licensing boards 3. Specialty societies.  These organizations serve themselves rather than it's constituency/




Where is your hospital, medical center, clinic or provider ?

Healthkit, What is?




Tell us more

Ultimately patient needs and providee direction will create a new health information paradigm.

We are still in the earliest phase of the catalytic changes.  Some or most of the preceding changes may become obolete and discarded as health care evolves in the next decade(s).


Monday, September 12, 2016

Stanford Medicine X and Symplur announce an Everyone Included™ social media research challenge

Stanford Medicine X and Symplur announce an Everyone Included™ social media research challenge


Why ask questions about health care social media?

Social media use in health care and medicine has transformed how stakeholders discuss problems and innovate solutions. Who benefits from social media engagement in medicine? To what extent does it help form communities of practice, help patients feel less isolated, and unite caregivers and researchers in the common goal to improve health and cure disease? How might social media be used for medical education? What risks to patient privacy and health care might social media use impose? Who, if any, are being left out of these conversations? These are just a few important questions social media analytics might help elucidate.
Larry Chu  "We have patients getting involved in research!" Dr. Chu is an anesthesiologist at Stanford University Medical Center and the head of Stanford Medicine X.

Stanford Medicine X and Symplur announce an Everyone Included™ social media research challenge


This event which will take place in September 16-18th will discuss the use of data analytics.


Social media use in health care and medicine has transformed how stakeholders discuss problems and innovate solutions. Who benefits from social media engagement in medicine? To what extent does it help form communities of practice, help patients feel less isolated, and unite caregivers and researchers in the common goal to improve health and cure disease? What risks to patient privacy and health care might social media use impose? Who, if any, are being left out of these conversations? These are just a few important questions social media analytics might help elucidate.
Stanford Medicine X and Symplur are pleased to announce a joint initiative designed to spark scholarly research activity on health care social media. The Stanford Medicine X | Symplur Everyone Included™ Research Challenge asks all health care stakeholders to form partnerships and address one of the questions below:
      • How is social media transforming health care in 2016?
      • How is social media being used to innovate medical education
      • How can social media be used to create greater understanding between online health care communities? What can be learnt if they held joint TweetChats?
Some of the earlier discussions which have been recorded:

Inclusivity


Symplur Research Challenge


Everyone Included™  Ways of Listening


Everyone Included™ "Invisible Illnesses"








Stanford Medicine X and Symplur announce an Everyone Included™ social media research challenge